This makes it ideal for visible seams in your projects. Both trilobal polyester and cottonized polyester that comes from a quality manufacturer will have next to zero lint, which is another benefit of polyester thread. It's strong, has very low lint, and a beautiful matte finish. Interested in shopping for cotton quilting threads? Suitable bobbin thread. It also carries zero stretch to the thread, which is ideal for quilts, as the thread won’t cause the quilt to pucker after it’s been used or washed. Sulky Premium Polyester Invisible Thread (the only polyester invisible thread on the market today) is perfect for machine "hand-look" quilting, stitching in the ditch, and invisible applique. However, the process also removes a lot of the shine from the thread, giving it more of a matte finish that lets it hide in the fabric. A thread that doesn’t stretch is also easier to sew with. Brands such as 3sixteen and Dyer & Jenkins have used 100% polyester threads in their jeans for the greatest durability. However, by quilting with a 100wt cottonized polyester, you can see how this change in thread size significantly reduces how much the thread shows up in the fabric. The flexibility in size that a cottonized polyester thread affords can do a lot to change how much, or how little, the appearance of the thread plays in your quilt. Watch our YouTube video right here! There are benefits to both kinds of materials, so we hope we helped you understand the differences so that you can choose the type of thread with the qualities you prefer. I use 100% cotton thread for piecing, and use polyester for machine quilting (top & bottom threads). Cotton thread is a versatile option that most people use for everything from piecing to quilting and has been relied on for thousands of years. A strong fine thread like DecoBob 80wt is also ideal for piecing because it allows the seams to lay flatter, making your piecing not only look better, but it also makes it easier to line up your quilt block patterns. Were you inspired to sew with WonderFil threads? High-quality polyester holds its shape well and doesn’t shrink. Comment document.getElementById("comment").setAttribute( "id", "af7506a421cfcd588cce72857e7eaa7d" );document.getElementById("bef60f7a2b").setAttribute( "id", "comment" ); Quilting With Cotton vs Polyester – What’s the Difference? Skin Irritations: Cotton suits all skin types since it’s a natural product. Quilting Questions; If this is your first visit to the Missouri Star Quilt Co's "Quilter's Forum", be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. This thread is spun from a natural fibre that gives the distinct matte look of cotton. You’ll find yourself fighting with it all the way. I think it is a poly-cotton blend. Polyester Core, Cotton Wrap Thread Polyester is a man-made product. Help avoid future wear at the seams by choosing a thread that's no stronger than the fabric. Your email address will not be published. This helps it reflect more light from its surface, giving it a shine that you won’t find in a cottonized polyester. There are two distinctly different kinds of polyester thread commonly used for quilting, so let’s take a look at the first one: cottonized polyester. Color: Cotton fades away in a short time period. The lack of stretch in cotton thread also makes it ideal for quilting projects because they won't lose their shape. Durability: Cotton is not as durable as polyester. There are benefits to both kinds of materials, so we hope we helped you understand the differences so that you can choose the type of thread with the qualities you prefer. The high-sheen finish will give your project a rich appeal and style. If you want your quilting to have that glossy look, then trilobal polyester is a great option. Egyptian cotton is also popular with quilters. https://shopwonderfil.com/product-category/konfetti/, https://shopwonderfil.com/product-category/tutti/, https://shopwonderfil.com/product-category/invisafil/, https://shopwonderfil.com/product-category/decobob/, https://shopwonderfil.com/product-category/masterquilter/, https://shopwonderfil.com/product-category/fabulux/. You can change your mind at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of any email you receive from us. You can check out some of our cotton thread lines at the following links: Konfetti™ 50wt Egyptian Cotton Thread: https://wonderfil.co.uk/collections/konfetti-50wt-3ply-egyptian-cotton, Tutti™ 50wt Variegated 50wt Egyptian Cotton Thread: https://wonderfil.co.uk/collections/tutti. Glazed cotton thread is for Hand Quilting. Comparing how a cotton thread stitches out next to a cottonized polyester of a similar weight, you can still see that a cottonized polyester still has more shine than cotton. The first is how it looks. 99 $13.99 $13.99 Specialty threads such as metallics and invisible thread can also be used in your machine, but require some speed and tension adjustments to run successfully. However, the process also removes a lot of the shine from the thread, giving it more of a matte finish that lets it hide in the fabric. Because it’s made from a natural material, you’ll find that the associated cost may be slightly higher in comparison to a polyester thread of similar quality, however there are many perks associated with cotton. You can shop the polyester threads mentioned above at the following links: InvisaFil™ 100wt Cottonized Poly: https://shopwonderfil.com/product-category/invisafil/, DecoBob™ 80wt Cottonized Poly: https://shopwonderfil.com/product-category/decobob/. Quilting With Cotton vs Polyester – What’s the Difference? While the name may be misleading, a cottonized polyester is still actually 100% polyester. use the thread that fits your needs and don't worry about it. In comparison, polyester thread is a newer type of material that is synthetic, not grown. Visit the JOANN sewing shop for a wide selection of embroidery thread, floss & thread spools. It is a very fine .004 monofilament that is soft enough for … However, by quilting with a 100wt cottonized polyester, you can see how this change in thread size significantly reduces how much the thread shows up in the fabric. Developed by quilters for quilters, this high quality 100% cotton thread is great for all of your general sewing needs. Shop Master Quilter™ Cottonized Poly here: https://shopwonderfil.com/product-category/masterquilter/. Both trilobal polyester and cottonized polyester that comes from a quality manufacturer will have next to zero lint, which is another benefit of polyester thread. You can shop Fabulux™ 40wt Trilobal Poly here: https://shopwonderfil.com/product-category/fabulux/, Between these three threads, a trilobal polyester will stand out the most and has the most shine in its finish. I began my quilting venture as a cotton “purist.” After sitting for hours picking out popped quilting stitches on a 3 year old lap size quilt (little used, if I may add) that I had quilted with a premium well-loved cotton thread, I will forevermore use polyester thread for quilting. Your email address will not be published. DR. BOB. If you want to really show off your quilting, choose a batting with high loft, such as polyester or wool, for added drama and dimension. Register by clicking here! All times are GMT -8. The majority of the fabrics in this quilt are “normal” quilting fabrics but the white is eyelet. You can check out some of our cotton thread lines at the following links: Konfetti™ 50wt Egyptian Cotton Thread: https://shopwonderfil.com/product-category/konfetti/, Tutti™ 50wt Variegated 50wt Egyptian Cotton Thread: https://shopwonderfil.com/product-category/tutti/. Want to see just how well these threads perform on quilting projects? However, this question is raised because polyester from many decades ago used to do this, which is why some quilters prefer to use cotton. Loft refers to the thickness/puffiness of the batting. Most quilters will come across two different thread materials to choose from when they shop for quilting threads: cotton and polyester. Cotton thread will have the most matte look, while a cottonized polyester falls in between the two. Therefore, you can take advantage of sewing with a thread that’s ideal for quilting when you don’t want the thread to show as it hides significantly better in the fabric. Find a store in your area that carries WonderFil, or shop online at https://www.shopwonderfil.com/shop-local. Cotton has a distinct texture and non-reflective matte finish that allows it to blend into the fabric better. thread, the stitches are visible when quilted. The soft fibers of the cotton help grip the slippery clear thread making a nice, soft looking stitch. Polyester is extremely durable. As a 40 wt. However, by quilting with a 100wt cottonized polyester, you can see how this change in thread size significantly reduces how much the thread shows up in the fabric. Comparing how a cotton thread stitches out next to a cottonized polyester of a similar weight, you can still see that a cottonized polyester still has more shine than cotton. Not sure of the supportive data but that was recommendations from a couple of quilt shop classes I attended. If you like the look of a flat, traditional quilt, choose something with a low loft, such as cotton. Because of this, the cost may be slightly less than a quality cotton thread, however that doesn’t mean you’re compromising on quality. There are a number of other advantages to polyester thread: Durable: Designed for heavy duty use; Strong: More tensile strength than rayon or cotton; Colorfast: Polyester fibers … Dries quickly: Unlike cotton, polyester isn’t absorbent. However, using invisible thread can be more challenging that using regular thread like cotton or polyester. The first is how it looks. You can shop Fabulux™ 40wt Trilobal Poly here: https://wonderfil.co.uk/collections/fabulux, Between these three threads, a trilobal polyester will stand out the most and has the most shine in its finish. Were you inspired to sew with WonderFil threads? In today’s blog, we’ll break down the key differences between these two kinds of threads so you can make an informed decision when buying the right quilting thread for your project. For a polyester thread that stands out a little more, you can reach for a trilobal polyester. Needle-Punched A cotton at a 100wt or 80wt size will not be nearly as strong as the same thread made from polyester. King Tut is an Egyptian-grown extra-long staple cotton thread (what a mouthful). Which one is better and when should you use one over the other? Cotton vs Polyester: Cotton is a natural product. The polyester makes it difficult for the sewing machine needle to piece the weave, (as the denier is much heavier in polyester than cotton) and also polycotton makes the quilt slip over the machine surface. thread lines are popular quilting thread. Shop brands like Coats & Clark, Gutermann & Sulky online. If you want your quilting to have that glossy look, then trilobal polyester is a great option. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. You can also sign up for our free newsletter to receive more educational sewing tips, tutorials, and free patterns. Polyester thread has a little bit of stretch to it, so anything you are sewing to wear should be made with polyester or nylon thread. Therefore, you can take advantage of sewing with a thread that’s ideal for quilting when you don’t want the thread to show as it hides significantly better in the fabric. You can sign up for our free newsletter to receive more educational sewing tips, tutorials, and free patterns. there is no right or wrong. Shop Master Quilter™ Cottonized Poly here: https://wonderfil.co.uk/collections/master-quilter. For a polyester thread that stands out a little more, you can reach for a trilobal polyester. It is practical for nearly any sewing project, both by hand and machine, and is especially useful for blended fabrics. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. Signature Cotton Wrapped Polyester Polycore Thread Articles 67 and 68: Signature Cotton Polyester Thread is made from cotton covered polyester and is a natural choice for those who require an extra strong thread for machine quilting, but prefer cotton thread to match their cotton fabrics. Watch our YouTube video right here! There is a longstanding debate among quilters about cotton verses polyester thread. This thread has been treated to take all of the stretch from the thread, making it incredibly easy to sew with. In comparison, polyester thread is a newer type of material that is synthetic, not grown. POLYESTER. All-cotton threads are readily available and are the best choice for piecing our quilting fabrics. Essential Quilting Thread NEW colors available now! Cotton Threads Cotton thread is a little bit stronger than polyester thread and a lot softer. Register by clicking here! Polyester is far stronger than cotton, and as a result, you can find this thread in significantly smaller sizes than cotton will be available in because the thread will still retain its strength, even at a super fine size like 100wt. This will significantly reduce the lint build up in your machine. Which one is better and when should you use one over the other? May have been a fluke, but I will never risk that again! So Fine! Using invisible thread can be a great way to quilt your quilt when you want the fabric and pieced pattern of the quilt top to be the star of the design, rather than the quilting itself. Comparing how a cotton thread stitches out next to a cottonized polyester of a similar weight, you can still see that a cottonized polyester still has more shine than cotton. The short answer is no, polyester thread is safe to quilt with and won’t damage your fabric. It also carries zero stretch to the thread, which is ideal for quilts, as the thread won’t cause the quilt to pucker after it’s been used or washed. Our King Tut and So Fine! Fixing that problem is more difficult than repairing a seam where the thread has broken or worn away. Cotton thread will have the most matte look, while a cottonized polyester falls in between the two. But we also want to touch on one of the most common questions we get asked: will polyester thread cut into the fabric? Cotton has a distinct texture and non-reflective matte finish that allows it to blend into the fabric better. However, by quilting with a 100wt cottonized polyester, you can see how this change in thread size significantly reduces how much the thread shows up in the fabric. Polyester threads do have some give or stretch to them. The flexibility in size that a cottonized polyester thread affords can do a lot to change how much, or how little, the appearance of the thread plays in your quilt. Most threads are round in shape, but a trilobal polyester is actually triangular in shape. We represent you the all … For more information about how your email will be used and stored, please read our privacy policy. A cotton at a 100wt or 80wt size will not be nearly as strong as the same thread made from polyester. You can use clear thread in the bobbin if you'd like. The short answer is no, polyester thread is safe to quilt with and won’t damage your fabric. 1hr Scrappy Christmas Potholder – Perfect for using up your scraps. We will treat your information with respect. Most threads are round in shape, but a trilobal polyester is actually triangular in shape. There are two distinctly different kinds of polyester thread commonly used for quilting, so let’s take a look at the first one: cottonized polyester. Interested in shopping for cotton quilting threads? There's an argument against using polyester thread in piecing saying because the poly is so much stronger than the cotton fibers, it will cut or 'saw' through seam allowances over time. Guttermann 100% polyester thread: This is one of the more expensive threads on the market and has far fewer loose fibers than the bargain brands. You may also consider a high-sheen polyester thread for machine embroidery projects. The only challenge I remember is that sometimes when I went over the embroidered part of the eyelet, the bulk of the extra thread made my stitching go crooked. Sign up for our newsletter (sent 1-3 times a month) for sewing tips, free patterns and tutorials, news and updates, and promotions. Some worry that polyester threads will cut through cotton quilt fabrics, and, indeed, this was a problem with the polyester threads manufactured in the 70's and 80's. The most common, and the best thread, for quilting is a 40-weight cotton thread. We’ll see you again next time! Since then, polyester thread manufacturing has greatly improved, and this is no longer an issue that comes up. Want to see just how well these threads perform on quilting projects? You can shop the polyester threads mentioned above at the following links: InvisaFil™ 100wt Cottonized Poly: https://wonderfil.co.uk/collections/invisafil, DecoBob™ 80wt Cottonized Poly: https://wonderfil.co.uk/collections/decobob-80wt-2ply-cottonized-polyester. This helps it reflect more light from its surface, giving it a shine that you won’t find in a cottonized polyester. There are benefits to both kinds of materials, so we hope we helped you understand the differences so that you can choose the type of thread with the qualities you prefer. That means it's best to avoid polyester threads and overly strong cotton threads. The downside however, is that polyester thread is generally thicker, kinks more easily, and will melt at high temperatures. But really, what’s the difference? Because of these qualities, this type of polyester is most similar to cotton, and is named because of its cotton-like characteristics. A medium luster thread, it is suitable for almost any quilting project. Most quilters will come across two different thread materials to choose from when they shop for quilting threads: cotton and polyester. Cotton thread is the traditional choice for quilting. Cotton thread will have the most matte look, while a cottonized polyester falls in between the two. But really, what’s the difference? thousands of people sew, and quilt with polyester thread each and every day with great success...some people use only cotton, some people use only poly, some use rayon, some use cotton/poly blends, some use silk, some use wool. Use a quality 100% 50 wt cotton thread like Aurifil or Masterpiece, matching the bobbin thread to the quilt backing fabric. Coats & Clark Transparent Polyester Thread. In today’s blog, we’ll break down the key differences between these two kinds of threads so you can make an informed decision when buying the right quilting thread for your project. Cotton thread still has a foothold in the quilting arena, but has lost much of its traction to modern polyester threads that promise colorfastness, strength, durability, and lint-free quilting. Bob Purcell (Chief Threadologist of Superior Threads) discusses Glazed (waxed, coated, starched) Cotton thread. Cotton thread is a versatile option that most people use for everything from piecing to quilting and has been relied on for thousands of years. The polyester thread holds up much better than any cotton thread under these conditions, increasing the longevity of your quilt. While the name may be misleading, a cottonized polyester is still actually 100% polyester. It’s definitely not your go-to for towels. Because it’s made from a natural material, you’ll find that the associated cost may be slightly higher in comparison to a polyester thread of similar quality, however there are many perks associated with cotton. It is also ideal for hems. Polyester retains its colors and shines for a long time. ! It is not recommended to use polyester cotton sheets for backing of quilts either. This thread is spun from a natural fibre that gives the distinct matte look of cotton. But we also want to touch on one of the most common questions we get asked: will polyester thread cut into the fabric? Accent™ 12wt/2ply Rayon Embroidery Thread, https://wonderfil.co.uk/collections/konfetti-50wt-3ply-egyptian-cotton, https://wonderfil.co.uk/collections/tutti, https://wonderfil.co.uk/collections/invisafil, https://wonderfil.co.uk/collections/decobob-80wt-2ply-cottonized-polyester, https://wonderfil.co.uk/collections/master-quilter, https://wonderfil.co.uk/collections/fabulux. Mettler Metrosene Plus 100% Polyester: Very few loose fibers. is a multifilament polyester thread. Polyester is far stronger than cotton, and as a result, you can find this thread in significantly smaller sizes than cotton will be available in because the thread will still retain its strength, even at a super fine size like 100wt. Cotton-wrapped polyester thread is an all-purpose thread often referred to as "dual duty." It is stronger than than 100 percent cotton thread. Since then, polyester thread manufacturing has greatly improved, and this is no longer an issue that comes up. However, this question is raised because polyester from many decades ago used to do this, which is why some quilters prefer to use cotton. Over time, the stronger polyester thread can break down the weaker cotton fiber of the fabric. Because of these qualities, this type of polyester is most similar to cotton, and is named because of its cotton-like characteristics. Comparing how a cotton thread stitches out next to a cottonized polyester of a similar weight, you can still see that a cottonized polyester still has more shine than cotton. A strong fine thread like DecoBob 80wt is also ideal for piecing because it allows the seams to lay flatter, making your piecing not only look better, but it also makes it easier to line up your quilt block patterns. Luxbon 39 Spools Rainbow Polyester Sewing Thread Box Kit Set Ideal for Quilting Stitching/Hand Sewing/Machine Sewing 4.3 out of 5 stars 3,774 $10.99 $ 10 . This thread has been treated to take all of the stretch from the thread, making it incredibly easy to sew with. Less fading: Polyester holds dye well to prevent fading, but doesn’t produce as “rich” of a color as cotton. A thread that doesn’t stretch is also easier to sew with. Running a glazed cotton through a machine will gum up anywhere where the … For quilting, choose a cotton-covered polyester thread for its cotton appearance and polyester strength.
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